Emergency Management
1618 N. Rebecca Ave
Spokane, WA 99217
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LEPC (Local Emergency Planning Committee)

Mission Statement

"To enhance the protection of the community and the environment from hazardous materials incidents through planning, preparation and communication between citizens, business and government."

What is LEPC?

A committee required by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) that is made up of representatives from government, industry, elected officials, environmental groups and others.

Spokane City/County LEPC has incorporated the planning requirements of Title III into the community Emergency Management Plan developed by Spokane City/County Department of Emergency Management.

Business using or generating certain quantities of materials on the EPA's Extremely Hazardous Substance list must report to the LEPC and their local fire departments. 

Who does the emergency planning?

Any business which uses, manufactures, stores or transports hazardous materials is required to have procedures for safe handling of these materials as well as emergency response procedures.

Fire departments and other response agencies are also required to have procedures for hazardous materials spills.

Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials have one or more of the following characteristics:

  • Corrosive
  • Flammable
  • Poisonous
  • Toxic Fumes

Many solids, gasses and liquids used in the production of fuels, medicines, plastics, and other products and processes in our community are classified as hazardous. Hazardous materials are used. stored and transported daily throughout the country.

Under most circumstances, these materials are handled safely.  However, when improperly handled, disposed of or released these substances can become hazardous to people and the environment necessitating coordinated planning for emergencies.

Community Right to Know

The LEPC has set up a Community Right to Know Program which incorporates the chemicals reported to the LEPC by local businesses.

This program is based upon the 1986 Title III of SARA. This legislation requires local planning by businesses and response agencies (such as fire departments) whenever hazardous materials are involved. SARA also requires the establishment of a system in each community that informs citizens of chemicals used, manufactured or stored locally.

Public Disclosure is covered by Spokane County Policy. http://www.spokanecounty.org/data/common/pdf/publicrecordpolicies.pdf

Workers Right to Know

Laws exist which require a Hazard Communication Standard also known as the Worker Right to Know program.  Employers are required to inform employees of chemical hazards present in the workplace.

For more information about Worker Right to Know contact your supervisor or the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries Safety and Health toll free information at 800.423.7233  

Shelter-in-Place

Shelter-in-Place procedures may be required for a variety of reasons to respond to a natural or manmade hazard, disaster or accident. The local Fire, Police, Emergency First Responders or Incident Commander is responsible for determining when the public needs to Shelter-in-Place.

The following are the basic Sheltering-in-Place steps.

In an emergency, please follow the Sheltering-in-Place steps below in order:

At Home

  1. Move everyone inside (including pets), shut & lock all doors & windows
  2. Turn off heating, air conditioning & ventilation systems
  3. Move everyone to the designated sheltering room(s), further inside the house
  4. Bring water, cell-phones, snacks & flashlights into the room
  5. Ensure room has wired phone, radio w/batteries and/or a TV
  6. Seal any windows, vents, door cracks and other openings with plastic & duct tape
  7. Turn on the TV or radio. Wait for further instructions & the "All Clear" signal to be given
  8. After "All Clear" is given, check for any injuries or illness and un-seal room
  9. Turn on heating, air conditioning & ventilation systems
  10. Open appropriate doors and windows to properly air out the house
  11. Report any injuries, illness or damages to authorities

Outside or Driving

  1. If moving, pull to the side of the road and shut off vehicle
  2. Get everyone inside the vehicle (including pets), shut & lock all doors, roll up the windows
  3. Turn off all the vents, heating or air conditioning systems in the vehicle
  4. Turn on radio. Wait for further instructions and "All Clear" signal to be given.
  5. When "All Clear" signal is given. Open windows and vents to air out vehicle.

At Work

  1. Move everyone inside (including visitors), shut & lock all doors & windows
  2. Designate 2 two people to each of the following tasks
    • Turn off heating, air conditioning & ventilation systems
    • Move everyone to the designated sheltering room (s) [Plan for those w/Special Needs]
    • Bring water, cell-phones, snacks & flashlights into the room
    • Ensure room has wired phone, radio w/batteries and/or a TV
    • Take accountability of employees & visitors
  3. Seal any windows or vents with plastic & duct tape
  4. Seal openings around doors & other areas with duct tape
  5. Turn on the TV or radio & wait for further instructions
  6. Wait for the "All Clear" signal to be given
  7. After "All Clear", take accountability and un-seal room
  8. Turn on heating, air conditioning & ventilation system
  9. Open appropriate doors and windows
  10. Report any injuries or damages to authorities
  11. Resume normal business

Shelter-in-Place Kits should include:

  1. Radio w/Batteries
  2. First Aid Kit
  3. Flashlight
  4. Pre-Cut Plastic
  5. Duct Tape
  6. Scissors
  7. Bottled Water
  8. Cell Phone
  9. Snacks
  10. Necessary Individual Medication
  11. Emergency #’s